Dominican Republic FAQ

Program Preparation Information

  The information below is everything you'll need to prepare for your trip.

Program Life

Community

Community

When we refer to the community of participants and leaders in VISIONS, we mean it as best defined by M. Scott Peck in “The Different Drum”:

[A] group of individuals who have learned how to communicate honestly with each other, whose relationships go deeper than their masks of composure, and who have developed some significant commitment to . . . delight in each other, make others' conditions (their) own.

On a VISIONS program, we place a premium on building a sense of community and getting to know everyone in the group. Sometimes, community can mean “neighborhood” in the sense of sharing resources like power tools and physical labor, as we do in the communities where we work. On a deeper level, it can mean creating a kind of family out of strangers and it is this sense of community that we strive to create among our groups and leaders.

Community means embracing your responsibilities within the group rather than hiding in anonymity, respecting others, communicating clearly, and living together cooperatively. To encourage growth in each of those areas, your leaders will facilitate evening meetings that include every participant on the program. Your group will meet three or four nights a week for about an hour to speak and listen to each other. We almost always start by reflecting on the day, including the overall volunteer and cultural experiences. Sometimes an incident or event raises questions that deserve everyone’s perspective and input. When it’s called for, we also use the time to hash out issues and iron out differences. This is a time to communicate openly and to listen to others’ perspectives. It can also be an occasion for us to see how others perceive us, which is a valuable gift.

Through this forum, we stand to gain insight as well as more confident and effective communication skills, which are as useful as the physical skills we learn and apply during the day. Our focus is the here and now, and the integrity of the community, of both leaders and participants, living and learning together.

It is your time, our time, to build a foundation of trust and cohesiveness in the process of becoming a strong community.

There can be no vulnerability without risk; there can be no community without vulnerability;
there can be no peace —
and ultimately no life — without community.

- Scott Peck

Code of Ethics

  • Travel with a spirit of humility and a genuine desire to meet and talk with local people.
  • Be aware of the feelings of others. Act respectfully and avoid offensive behavior, including when taking photographs.
  • Cultivate the habit of actively listening and observing rather than merely hearing and seeing. Avoid the temptation to “know all the answers.”
  • Realize that others may have concepts of time and attitudes that are different—not inferior—to those you inherited from your own culture.
  • Instead of looking only for the exotic, discover the richness of another culture and way of life. Learn local customs and respect them.
  • Spend time each day reflecting on your experiences in order to deepen your understanding. Is your enrichment beneficial for all involved?
  • Be aware of why you are traveling in the first place. If you truly want a “home away from home,” why travel?

Compiled by The North American Center for Responsible Tourism, San Anselmo, CA

Program Expectations & Zero Tolerance Rules

Zero Tolerance Rules

VISIONS is a Zero Tolerance program regarding (1) consumption, possession, or attempted possession of alcohol or drugs/illegal substances; (2) sexual activity. Consuming, possessing, or attempting to possess alcohol or drugs/illegal substances will result in immediate dismissal from the program. Participants may not abuse over-the-counter drugs or use medications not prescribed to them. Sexual contact—meaning conduct deemed unacceptable in public places—also will result in dismissal. Remember that VISIONS focuses on an inclusive group dynamic, making cliques and romances out of sync with the goal of a powerful and life-changing experience. Please review the Enrollment Contract for the complete Terms of Participation.

The “Airplane Rules” (zero tolerance rules) are in place for everyone’s safety, health and welfare, common sense, group dynamic, and with local laws in mind. It is important to remember that local laws may be different than what you are used to, and in some locations, repercussions and penalties are severe and may have a long-lasting impact on your future. If a participant is sent home early from a program, the participant's parent/guardian will be responsible for booking the next available flight directly with the airline. VISIONS travel agent is not always available for these types of flight changes, and purchasing a new ticket is sometimes necessary.

Sending a participant home is difficult for everyone, but it will happen if an Airplane Rule is broken. Being sent home, even in final days of a program, results in forfeiture of the Certificate of Service and recognition of service hours. Again, the safety, health, and wellbeing of participants is at the core of our policies.

 

Buddy System and Boundaries

If you want to leave your homebase area during the occasional free time - for example, to stop at a store or to go for a run - you need to find someone in your group who is willing to go with you, and you must remain inside the pre-determined boundaries. You and your buddy check out with a leader, establishing where you will be and how long you will be gone. When you return, you check in with the same leader. 

The boundaries are explained by leaders on the first day of the program, and usually encompass our immediate neighborhood and the nearby places we know well. Our leaders need to know where everyone is at all times for your safety and for maintaining the general flow of the program. Participants will be with leaders at all times during non-daylight hours, unless there is a special case such as a dinner with a local family.

 

Getting Enough Sleep

VISIONS programs are demanding. We start early, work hard, and explore with passion. Free time can be used to catch a short nap, but to keep everyone healthy and energized throughout the program, we establish a set “lights out" time. Leaders consider the daily routines of our host communities and our personal program needs when setting those times. There are occasional exceptions including staying up for a social event, or sleeping in on a morning when leaders determine some extra rest will be beneficial for the group. Participants are welcome to use a headlamp to read after lights out, but we suspect that you will welcome sleep.

Health

Since VISIONS cannot provide medical advice regarding international travel or vaccinations, we recommend consulting with your family physician or a travel doctor, and keeping in mind that some vaccines require a series of shots that take place over several weeks. While there are no required vaccines for travel to the Dominican Republic, many travelers to developing countries choose to receive common travel vaccines including those for typhoid fever and / or hepatitis A.

We also suggest that you review the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website, and specifically the Dominican Republic page. Please note that the program is based in Santo Domingo, and some sessions include an excursions to the mountain town of Jarabacoa (anticipated itinerary here). There are several clinics and a major hospital in Santo Domingo, and participants carry the medical evacuation policy in case of any emergency that warrants further evacuation.

To learn more about health and risk management on VISIONS programs, refer to this FAQ link.

Note regarding mosquito-borne diseases: The CDC provides guidelines for the most effective types of insect repellent; see their website for their recommendations. 

Being In Touch

Program Updates

While VISIONS leaders do not post constant updates from the field (their primary job being to be fully present with the program and kids), we do post a few photos and short updates every week to the VISIONS Facebook and Instagram pages, which we invite you to follow.

Calling the Program

For urgent matters (only), call the program phone directly. Leave a message if there’s no answer, and messages are checked at least once a day. If you’re unable to get through, you may also call (not text) the VISIONS office. During off-hours, a 24-hour number is provided on the office message system.

  • Program Phone (as dialed from US): 1-809-931-4866
  • VISIONS Office: +1 (406) 551-4423
  • Director’s Name: Maureen Crammond

Weekly Calls Home

Remember that we make time for kids to connect with home once a week. Not all choose to do so, but the opportunity is provided. Leaders do not monitor how kids are using their phones, so parents should talk with kids before the program begins if you want to be sure that your child uses phone time to call home.

At our international sites, the common way for kids to make calls home is through WhatsApp, a free app that can be downloaded to smartphones. Program leaders take kids to a wifi spot for making calls, kids receive their personal phones for 30 minutes, and if both the student and parent already have WhatsApp downloaded to their phones, the call is free and convenient. If this option suits your family, please download WhatsApp on your respective phones. For kids or parents who don’t have this option, leaders will provide alternative options for making the calls (i.e.: using a landline).

CALL SCHEDULE

Participants receive their phones for approximately thirty minutes in order to make the calls, which will be made sometime during the following timeframes. All times ET.

  • July 1 between 4:30 & 8pm
  • July 8 between 4:30 & 8pm
  • July 15 between 4:30 & 8pm
  • July 21 between 4:30 & 8pm

MAILING ADDRESS
VISIONS – Participant’s Name
Calle 8 Casa 91, El Club
Sanchez Ramirez
Cotui, Republica Dominicana

Recommended Resources

Black in Latin America: Haiti & the Dominican Republic: An Island Divided, by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

  • “In the Dominican Republic, Professor Gates explores how race has been socially constructed in a society whose people reflect centuries of inter-marriage, and how the country’s troubled history with Haiti informs notions about racial classification. In Haiti, Professor Gates tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic, and finds out how the slaves’s hard fight for liberation over Napoleon Bonaparte’s French Empire became a double-edged sword.”
  • This hour-long documentary is a part of a four-part series that examines the descendants of Africans in Latin countries. Partnered with PBS, Professor Gates dives into the dynamic between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, through race and class.

In the Time of the Butterflies, by Julia Alvarez

  • “It is November 25, 1960, and three beautiful sisters have been found near their wrecked Jeep at the bottom of a 150-foot cliff on the north coast of the Dominican Republic. The official state newspaper reports their deaths as accidental. It does not mention that a fourth sister lives. Nor does it explain that the sisters were among the leading opponents of Gen. Rafael Leónidas Trujillo’s dictatorship. It doesn’t have to. Everybody knows of Las Mariposas–the Butterflies. In this extraordinary novel, the voices of all four sisters–Minerva, Patria, María Teresa, and the survivor, Dedé–speak across the decades to tell their own stories, from secret crushes to gunrunning, and to describe the everyday horrors of life under Trujillo’s rule. Through the art and magic of Julia Alvarez’s imagination, the martyred Butterflies live again in this novel of courage and love, and the human costs of political oppression.”
  • Historical fiction that follows the real lives of the four Mirabal sisters. This is an interesting insight into the three decade long rule of the dictator Rafael Leonidas Trujillo in the Domincan Republic.

The Dominican Republic: A National History, by Frank Moya Pons

  • “Moya Pons latest book is based on his well-known Manual de historia dominicana (1992), now in its tenth edition and considered a basic text in Dominican historiography. But his new book is more than a simple translation of the old classic; it is a revised and expanded edition, with new sections, detailed historical maps, and a comprehensive bibliographic essay. The book follows two parallel historical tracks. On the one hand, it is divided into thematic chapters that examine the distinct political periods in the country’s history, such as the Spanish, French, Haitian, and U.S. occupations and the several periods of self-rule. On the other hand, it pursues a socioeconomic history by establishing links, when pertinent, between socioeconomic conditions and political developments. Another notable feature of the book is that it examines contemporary events up to 1990. This remains the standard Dominican history textbook, in both English and Spanish. The general reader will find in this book an agreeable, clearly written history of the Dominican Republic, while the experienced scholar will find an indispensable reference.”
  • Wonderful overall history of the country. Great way to get introduced to all large historical events.

Why the Cocks Fight: Dominicans, Haitians and the Struggle for Hispaniola, by Michele Wacker

  • “Like two roosters in a fighting arena, Haiti and the Dominican Republic are encircled by barriers of geography and poverty. They co-inhabit the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, but their histories are as deeply divided as their cultures: one French-speaking and black, one Spanish-speaking and mulatto. Yet, despite their antagonism, the two countries share a national symbol in the rooster–and a fundamental activity and favorite sport in the cockfight. In this book, Michele Wucker asks: “If the symbols that dominate a culture accurately express a nation’s character, what kind of a country draws so heavily on images of cockfighting and roosters, birds bred to be aggressive? What does it mean when not one but two countries that are neighbors choose these symbols? Why do the cocks fight, and why do humans watch and glorify them?”
  • For those who want to take a deeper dive into the history of the D.R. and Haiti, this book is a good read.

Packing

Packing Guidelines / Tech Policy

When in Rome, Do As the Romans Do

VISIONS places a high value on respect of the community members who welcome us year after year. We are not tourists. We are temporary community members, and as such must strive to honor the standards of our host community. We all need to be conscious of adapting rather than imposing our usual day-to-day conduct or dress on the places we visit, as tourists tend to do. The community where we live and work will want to welcome you as a friend, so we must do our best not to alienate local contacts.

In addition to the cultural considerations, conservative dress protects you from the sun, heat, mosquito bites and minor cuts. Long-sleeved gauzy fabric is breathable and cool, and the body adjusts to protective clothing. You’ll be more comfortable if less of your skin is exposed.

  • Articles of clothing NOT permitted on VISIONS programs:
    • Short-shorts (shorter than mid-thigh) or short skirts
    • Crop tops or shirts that reveal midriff
    • Spaghetti strap shirts or dresses
    • Low cut shirts
    • Clothing that reveals undergarments
    • Spandex or yoga pants (wearing these under other clothing such as shorts is permitted)

Note: If you bring clothing items that don't follow the dress code described above, you won't be able to wear those items during the program. If you don't have sufficient appropriate clothing, you may need to purchase clothes on site. Thank you for your understanding.

 

Gadgets

  • VISIONS is a cell phone / tech-free program, but [non-phone] cameras are allowed and encouraged. If you choose not to bring one, leaders will be taking photos throughout the program and we will share the photos with everyone at the end of the program.
  • Cell phones, music devices, e-readers and any other gadgets will be collected on the first day and will be returned on the final day. We make every effort to safely secure electronic devices, but VISIONS is not responsible for lost or stolen items.

 

Why the tech policy?

  • First: The absence of these devices encourages us to take in the full texture of the community—the sights, smells, sounds and rhythms of daily life. Participants consistently comment after their VISIONS program that they were able to form deeper friendships, and they felt more connected to the community when the distractions of technology were removed.
  • Second: Because we are a group of non-locals, we will naturally stick out. Bringing gadgets only makes us targets for petty theft, and it accentuates the differences between our hosts and ourselves.

 

Spending Money

Tuition covers almost everything during the program, but some participants like to bring extra money (around $30-50 per week) for personal items such as souvenirs, snacks, and baggage fees. VISIONS leaders encourage participants to turn in cash and cards at the beginning of the program and then check the money/cards out as needed. Please refer to your airline’s website for baggage fees (if applicable).

  • ATM Card: VISIONS recommends bringing an ATM card. They are more secure than cash and ATMs provide local currency. Additionally, they can be held in a parent's name because ATMs do not require identification.
  • Credit Cards: We recommend bringing a credit card for things like baggage fees and other expenses where cards are accepted. Since many small shops will not accept credit cards, however, you will still need a means for cash.
  • Cash: Please do not bring more than $150 cash—VISIONS can lock up cash in a secure area, but we don't want to accept more than $150 per person. You can rely on the ATM card for additional money needs.
  • Prepaid Debit Cards: These cards often do not work well in small local shops, so please do not plan on this as a primary payment option, especially if traveling outside the U.S.

 

Medications

  • Carry medications in their original containers, clearly labeled. Confirm that you have enough for the entire trip.
  • We recommend you bring medications in your carry-on, so you will still have access to them if your luggage is delayed or lost.
  • It is recommended that participants carry a doctor’s letter that lists the diagnosis, treatment, and prescription routine (including generic names of the medication).

 

Snacks

Please do not bring a stash of snacks for the program as local shops have plenty that can be purchased. Healthy snacks are provided throughout each day and meals are prepared in quantities that allow for seconds. However, if you have special dietary needs noted on your health form that necessitate bringing some of your own food, you are welcome to do so.

Packing List

Please download and print the following packing list:

Link to Dominican Republic Packing List (Printable PDF)

Passport / ID / Visas

Visas are NOT required for U.S. citizens. However, U.S. citizens must have a passport that is valid up through the date of their re-entry to the U.S. Many countries are starting to require that passports are valid for at least six months following the return date, but this is not yet the case with the D.R. If you need a new passport, don’t delay! Processing for youth can take longer than adults, and you should pay for expedited processing if the trip date is less than two months away. U.S. citizens can hire a processing company (www.passportvisaexpress as an example), or do it yourself through the State Department (link here).

Passport Notes:

  • In addition to taking your passport to the program, please take a photocopy of the 2-page spread that includes your picture. Our leaders collect passports and photocopies for safekeeping during the program.
  • We also recommend that you leave a photocopy or digital image of your passport at home.
  • Participants who are not U.S. citizens must consult with the appropriate embassy or consulate regarding entry requirements. Please contact the VISIONS office if you need a letter confirming program participation.

Travel

Booking Flights
  • The VISIONS designated travel agent is Aileen Setiawan at Discover Travel, 215.925.6174 or aileen@discovertravelinc.com
  • VISIONS strongly recommends that flights are booked with Aileen since she has the arrival and departure parameters as well as an overview of all participants’ itineraries in order to facilitate travel days. It is not guaranteed that there will be more than one participant on every flight, but participants booking flights through Aileen will be placed on the same travel itineraries whenever possible.
  • If families choose not to book with Aileen, the itinerary must be submitted to VISIONS for approval prior to booking. Neither VISIONS nor our travel agent will be able to assist with travel issues associated with flights booked through an alternative option.
  • In cases of flight delays or changed flight dates, Aileen is a resource, but there will also be instances when parents may need to call an airline to assist.
  • Unaccompanied Minor (UM) Service is required by some airlines for minors who are not traveling with an adult. Aileen will inform you of the requirements, and please also check the regulations of your carrier. UM assistance is arranged directly with the airline, but you will need to share the details with VISIONS so we can pass it along to program leaders. If you are not booking with Aileen and are booking directly with the airline using miles, the airline might not advise you of the UM requirement, which can cause last minute issues at the airport. It is each family’s responsibility to take care of UM requirements well in advance of travel day.
Trip Insurance
If you wish to purchase Trip Cancellation Insurance, please read more here.
Pre-Departure Covid Details

Pre-program Health

  1. Limit potential exposure before the program start date (whether vaccinated or not).
    • Reminder: 90 days after having Covid-19, a person can still test positive.
  2. Covid-19 Vaccinations:
    • While not required, we recommend that eligible students have full vaccination prior to leaving for the program.

Testing

  • VISIONS Required Testing (whether vaccinated or not)
  1. Within five days of traveling to the program, you must take a COVID-19 Nasopharyngeal PCR test and receive a negative result.
    • Five days before traveling means not greater than five days from when a student begins to travel directly to the DR. The date & time of a student’s first flight is the benchmark for this.
    • Test results need to be on an official document (electronic or otherwise) that shows the following:
      • Laboratory name and contact details
      • Student’s name
      • Test taken, stating RT-PCR
      • Date and time that the sample was taken
      • Negative result for COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2
  2. Students traveling to the Dominican Republic do not have to provide a negative covid test to officials upon arrival. Instead, aleatory breath tests will be administered between 3 to 15 percent of travelers (at random) arriving at airports. However – please note that although D.R. officials don’t require the covid test — VISIONS does require that all students take a covid test prior to departure (directions above).
  3. The U.S. and many other countries require a negative test before entry. VISIONS will make sure that all students get this test at the end of the program (cost not included with tuition).

Register To Travel

  1. All students must complete the electronic ticket portal for entering (and exiting) the Dominican Republic.
    • LINK TO THE FORM IS HERE: https://eticket.migracion.gob.do/
  2. The form will ask you a series of questions. You will need the following:
    • Migratory Information
      • Name, Passport Number, etc.
      • Answer ‘no’ to staying in a hotel and airbnb.
    • Address at the Dominican Republic (you may need to override it’s auto-fill)
      • Province – Select Option: Sanchez Ramírez 
      • Municipality – Select Option: Cotuí
      • Section – Select Option: El Club
      • Street and Number – Calle 8 Casa 91
    • Flight Information
    • Customs Information
    • Public Health
  3. We recommend that you print and carry copies of this form when you fly, as well as a copy of your vaccination certificate (if applicable).
  4. Anyone who does not complete their travel requirements will be DENIED entry. VISIONS cannot override this, so follow all of the instructions carefully. This is the responsibility of each family.

Submit Forms

  1. Students will also be required to submit a copy of their Negative COVID-19 Test Results and copy of vaccination card (if applicable).
    • SUBMIT COVID TEST RESULTS AND COVID VACCINE CARD HERE.

Covid-19 Vaccinations

  1. While not required, we recommend that eligible students have full vaccination prior to leaving for the program.
Travel Days
  1. Print this information
  2. Review it before the trip
  3. Participant carries a physical copy while traveling (& can save to phone)

Pre-departure Checklist

  1. Within five days of traveling, take a COVID-19 Nasopharyngeal RT-PCT test and receive a negative result.
  2. Register to travel via the D.R. electronic ticket portal.
  3. Submit VISIONS forms: negative Covid-19 test results and copy of vaccination card.
  4. Print copies of electronic ticket form and vaccination certificate (if applicable). Carry with you!
  5. Check your airline for schedule changes the day before and the day of departure
  6. Keep your passport or other ID safe & accessible
  7. Have your money / ATM card safe & accessible
  8. Carry your cell phone and charger in your carry-on (rather than packing in checked bags)
  9. Download WhatsApp for Calls Home during the program (participants & parents)
  10. Put your home address (not program address) on your luggage tags
  11. Wear your VISIONS t-shirt on flight day if you can
  12. Carry an optional Parental Consent to Travel form (not mandatory)

Airport Arrival / Customs Instructions

  1. If you have a connection, go directly to the gate of the next flight, even if it’s a long connection. Check the flight screens for the gate number; ask for help from airport personnel as needed.
  2. Once in Santo Domingo, you will walk with everyone else from your flight through Immigration, where you will have your passport stamped and may be asked some questions.
  3. Provide the following info on your Customs form:
    • Primary purpose of the trip is “tourism,” since this is not for a job
    • The address you’ll be staying at is:
      • Province – Sanchez Ramirez
      • Municipality – Select Option: Cotui
      • Section – El Club
      • Street and Number – Calle 8 Casa 91
  4. Next you will collect your luggage and go through Customs.
  5. You will then exit the secure area where your VISIONS leaders will be waiting for you. Do not leave the airport until you’re with your leaders.
    • Note: there are often a lot of people meeting friends and family here, so it’s important that you actively look for your leaders.
  6. Leaders will be holding obvious orange umbrellas and wearing VISIONS t-shirts!
  7. Once with leaders, participants make a quick “arrival call home.” Note: this call may occur upwards of 2 hrs after the flight lands, due to the logistics of gathering the entire group.

Airport Issues Help

The VISIONS office is available 24/7 while participants are traveling at +1 (406) 551-4423.

  1. If there are any flight delays that will affect a participant’s arrival time (to the program), participants should contact the VISIONS office immediately.
  2. If bags are lost, leaders will do their best to handle it on the spot and will be in touch with parents if assistance is needed.
  3. If you cannot find leaders in the airport:
    • Remain inside the airport
    • Do not leave the secure pickup area
    • Actively look for leaders holding an orange umbrella and/or wearing VISIONS shirts
    • If after 10 minutes you have not found a leader, call the VISIONS office from a Customer Service desk or your own cell phone (service providers allow temporary phone service activation if needed.

General Departure Logistics

  1. Leaders travel with participants to the departure airport and they will remain on site until all flights have departed.
  2. Leaders will remind participants how to prepare for their return flights (for example: keep cash on hand for baggage fees, and keep your cell phone & charger in your carry-on, etc.)
  3. In the case of changes to return flights, we instruct participants to call parents (or whoever will be picking up). However, the VISIONS office is available for assistance if needed.